Audio

Forcing Canadian companies to respect human rights

Talking Radical Radio
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Emily Dwyer is the policy director at the Canadian Network on Corporate Accountability (CNCA), and Aidan Gilchirst-Blackwood is its network coordinator. The CNCA is a broad network of Canadian civil society organizations that are working to ensure that Canadian companies respect human rights and the environment when working abroad.

A legal challenge to keep Ontario students safe from COVID-19

Talking Radical Radio

Heather Hanwell, Kate Laing, and “Hannah” are members of Ontario School Safety, a group of Ontario residents, most of them parents, committed to ensuring that the province’s schools are safe enough for students, teachers, and other education workers, in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Working for a multi-issue "revolution of care" in Newfoundland

Talking Radical Radio

Kerri Claire Neil lives in St. John’s, Newfoundland, and she is the co-chair of the Social Justice Co-operative NL, an activist organization whose members work on a wide range of social, political, and environmental issues. Scott Neigh interviews her about their choice to be a co-operative, the many struggles they are involved in, and their “Revolution of Care Manifesto.”

Seeking healing, justice, and change in the wake of the convoy occupation

Talking Radical Radio

Debbie Owusu-Akyeeah and Gaëlle Muderi are long-time residents of Ottawa who are involved in the Ottawa People’s Commission on the Convoy Occupation – Owusu-Akyeeah as a commissioner and Muderi as project coordaintor. The commission is a grassroots, nonpartisan initiative to listen to the voices of Ottawa residents in order to chronicle what happened in the city during and after February’s convoy protest, and to document its impacts on the people who live there.

Settlers building decolonial solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en

Talking Radical Radio

Kate Turner is a climate justice organizer living on unceded Kanien’kehá:ka territory in Tiohti:áke, or Montreal. Chantal Pelletier is a retired speech and language pathologist living on unceded Anishnaabe land in Gatineau, Quebec. Both are active with the Decolonial Solidarity Campaign, a network of affinity groups across so-called Canada acting in solidarity with the Wet’suwet’en people’s struggle against the Coastal Gas Link (CGL) pipeline by targeting the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC), one of CGL’s main financers.

Anti-racism in smaller cities and towns

Talking Radical Radio

Saleh Waziruddin is an anti-racist activist in St. Catharines, Ontario, and an executive committee member of the Niagara Region Anti-Racism Association (NRARA). Scott Neigh interviews him about doing locally-focused grassroots anti-racism work in a place like Niagara – comprised of smaller cities, towns, and rural areas – and how it differs from anti-racism in larger cities.

Migrant worker organizing in Nova Scotia

Talking Radical Radio

Stacey Gomez lives in Halifax (aka Kjipuktuk) in Nova Scotia, within Mi’kmaqi, and she is a migrant justice organizer with No One Is Illegal – Halifax/Kjipuktuk. Scott Neigh interviews her about the group’s origins and about its work as the first grassroots effort in Atlantic Canada focused on organizing with migrant agricultural workers.

Bringing sustainability and justice together in a small community

Talking Radical Radio

Jason Mogus is a long-time climate campaigner and a co-founder of Salt Spring Solutions, a local group on Salt Spring Island in British Columbia that is seeking to address their community’s housing crisis in sustainable ways, in the face of opposition that is framed in environmental terms.

Older adults and the fight for climate action

Talking Radical Radio

Betty Plewes is a co-founder and steering committee member of Climate Legacy, a group of retired people working together to engage and mobilize other older adults in climate action. Emma Bider is the organization’s communications coordinator. Scott Neigh interviews them about the roles that seniors are playing in addressing the climate crisis.

Low-wage workers organizing in Newfoundland

Talking Radical Radio

Mark Nichols is an organizer with the Workers’ Action Network of Newfoundland and Labrador, which brings together workers in low-wage, precarious jobs to support each other and to fight collectively for decent work for all. Scott Neigh interviews him about what low-wage work looks like in Newfoundland and about the network.

Practical climate action in Atlantic Canada

Talking Radical Radio

Emma Norton is a climate activist based in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, in Mi’qmaki. She is the operations director at the ReCover Initiative and the Atlantic director with the Climate Emergency Unit. Scott Neigh interviews her about her work on climate issues, and about the crucial interconnection between practical measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grassroots political work aimed at policy change.

Anti-ableism and disability justice education

Talking Radical Radio

Kate Welsh and Dev Ramsawakh are co-creators of the CRIP Collective, a small group of Toronto-based disabled educators and artists who do anti-ableism, anti-oppression, and disability justice-related workshops, and various other kinds of community building with disabled people, using an intersectional approach.

Story and film as tools for decolonization

Talking Radical Radio

Gladys Rowe, Teddy Zegeye-Gebrehiwot, and Liz Carlson-Manathara are part of Stories of Decolonization, a film project that is working to give people in Canada a chance to reflect on how colonization shapes our lives, on what decolonization might mean, and on how we might act to get there. Scott Neigh interviews them about the role that story and film can play in larger processes decolonization and about their many years of work on the project.

Immigrant workers confronting the people who exploit them

Talking Radical Radio

Simran Kaur Dhunna and Bikram Singh are members of the Naujawan Support Network, a group of international students and immigrant workers primarily based in Brampton, Ontario, who are challenging the exploitation and mistreatment that their members face using protest, mutual support, and collective direct action.

Climate disaster stories as a catalyst for change

Talking Radical Radio

Sean Holman is the Wayne Crookes professor of Environmental and Climate Journalism at the University of Victoria, in Lekwungen territory on Vancouver Island. Scott Neigh interviews him about changes in the role played by journalism in our current political moment, about the news media’s response to the climate crisis so far, and about the new model for covering it that is being developed as part of the Climate Disaster Project.